Courses

Sunday and Monday, October 25th and 26th, 2020:

Cancelled

lene@itu.dk

Synopsis

The course will use a game format to introduce integrating UX into Scrum and will be centered around a practical exercise, where the participants will be part of a simulation of Scrum development with the integration of UX design roles, using LEGO bricks as building material instead of code.

The exercise will be based on Alexey Krivitsky’s widely used LEGO Scrum simulation exercise meant for introducing Scrum to newcomers. Where Krivitsky’s game focuses solely on agile principles and Scrum roles in a development context we seek to create an extra layer of complexity and explore the integration of the role of the UX Designer in the exercise.

Furthermore, themes such as organizational complexity and cooperation across several teams will be explored. Participants will be divided into two groups working parts of the same project, but each following a different method for integrating UX with the development. As the game progresses various challenges and scope changes will arise in the form of constraints, user feedback, shifting priorities and cooperation with other non-agile stakeholders.

In the end, the participants will be part of a group discussion comparing the methods and discussing possible improvements.

Audience

If you are a practitioner, especially from a design consultancy, who have little or no understanding of what happens to your design after hand-over to developers or companies working agile, this course is for you.

If you work in a software company, either in a traditional waterfall model setting with a need to transition to agile or in an agile development setting but with a need to integrate better with other roles, this course is for you.

Learning outcomes
  • Understand the principles behind agile development with a focus on Scrum - many UX-designers are not familiar with these principles and how they affect the design and development of digital solutions
  • Understand two of the existing models to integrate UX in agile development - as UX designer you need to be able to recognize the models in order to improve or change upon them.
  • Understand the organizational problems relating to the integration of UX in an agile development environment.
  • The ability to reflect upon and develop new ways of integrating UX in Scrum.
Prerequisites

You should have knowledge of UX principles and design methods both in theory and practice. Furthermore, a basic understanding of agile principles might be helpful for the game section of the course.

Instructors

Bjarke Daugaard, Department of Business IT, IT University Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (bada@itu.dk).

Bjarke Daugaard is Chief Service Designer at Danske Bank and External Lecturer at the IT University of Copenhagen. He has been part of building multiple products and services in both startups and corporations and has been responsible for integrating agile ways of working across cross-functional teams.

Lene Nielsen, Department of Business IT, IT University Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (lene@itu.dk).

Lene Nielsen is Associate Professor at the IT University of Copenhagen, she has applied and researched the persona method for more than 20 years, including the use of the method in agile development. She has done studies on integrating UX in agile development.

October 26 2020

15:00-18:00 (3 hours, with a break)

Online

https://blogs.aalto.fi/chisdcourse

Synopsis

Are you a UX expert needing Service Design skills? An educator teaching Service Design for HCI-oriented students?

In this course, you will learn essential logic, tools and methods of Service Design, which can bring a more holistic and systemic perspective to your UX and interaction design work. The course will walk you through how Service Design goes beyond mere designing of digital services but promotes a holistic perspective to developing human-centered and viable service journeys and systems.

Audience

UX designers in academia or industry, UX researchers, Educators.

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes include academic and practical ones. After this course, the attendees are able to:

  • Conceptualize the relation between UXD and SD through a better understanding of SD history, scope, process, and basic terminology.
  • Work together with service designers through a better understanding of SD history, scope, process, and basic terminology.
  • Organize UX work to fit within a SD project by understanding the relation of UXD and SD and the possible roles of UX designers in SD projects.
Prerequisites

The participants are not expected to have any prior knowledge of service design. Basic understanding of UX design and user-centric design processes will be helpful to understand the similarities and differences between SD and UX design.

Instructors

Virpi Roto is Professor of Practice in Experience Design in Aalto University, Finland.

She studies experience design in the intersection of UX and service design. Her methodological research aims to provide techniques for practitioners to improve user experiences. She was the lead organizer of NordiCHI’16, CHI’18, and Nordes’19 workshops on the relation of UX and service design, and she has run UX courses and SIG sessions at CHI.

Val Mitchell is Programme Director of the UX Design MA at Loughborough University.

Lene Nielsen is Associate Professor at the IT University of Copenhagen, she has applied and researched the persona method for more than 20 years, including the use of the method in agile development. She has done studies on integrating UX in agile development.

Stuart Cockbill specializes in teaching service design as part of the UX Design MA at Loughborough University.

His research uses co-design processes to incorporate personal data within the design of future technologies and services.

Jodi Forlizzi is the Geschke Director and a Professor in the HCI Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

Her current research interests include designing services in the form of educational games, assistive robots, social agents, and healthcare services. She is interested in the intersection of algorithms and human service delivery.

Jung-Joo Lee is a Deputy Head of Research and Assistant Professor in Division of Industrial Design, National University of Singapore, and a Director of Service Design Lab Singapore.

Her research investigates roles of service design in organizational transformation and public-sector innovation. She was a co-organizer of workshops at CHI’15, CHI’18, and Nordes’19.

Effie Law is a full Professor in HCI, specialising in usability and UX methodologies.

She was a co-organizer of NordiCHI’16, CHI’18 and Nordes’19 workshops on the relation between UX and Service Design. She was an instructor for the course on UX evaluation methods at CHI.

October 26 2020

11:30-13:00 (1,5 hours, one break)

Online

Synopsis

The course introduces and gives practical training in visual dissemination of HCI research for different contexts, such as conference/poster presentations for an expert audience, or popular science presentations for a more general audience. By taking the course you will get the basic knowledge and skills you need to create good and reader-friendly presentations, as well as illustrations and data visualizations for presentations, posters, theses and scientific papers.

Audience

The intended audience for this course is researchers, lecturers, teachers, doctoral students, students and UX-professionals and practitioners who want to learn how to communicate and disseminate HCI research better. There will be a maximum of 30 participants.

If you work in a software company, either in a traditional waterfall model setting with a need to transition to agile or in an agile development setting but with a need to integrate better with other roles, this course is for you.

Learning outcomes

The course will be a mix of theory and practical tips based on our cognitive strengths and limitations. There will be several hands-on exercises where the participants work on and improve their own presentations, posters or papers. As such, participants will develop an understanding of:

  • How our brain works
  • The difference between conference and popular science presentations
  • Slide layout and design
  • Using images in presentations
  • The role of text and typography
  • How to use figures, illustrations and models
  • Tables, graphs and data visualizations
  • When to use Videos in presentations
  • Using props in presentations
  • Basics of poster design
Prerequisites

The participants should have experience with HCI research and bring a presentation they are working on. They should also have experience with presentation tools, such as PowerPoint or Keynote, and preferably some basic experience with graphic software, such as Adobe Illustrator.

Instructors

Ole Andreas Alsos, Head of Department of Design, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Ole Andreas Alsos is Head of Department of Design at Norwegian University of Science and Technology since 2017. Alsos has a PhD in usability from NTNU. He has long experience as a usability specialist and UX designer from the IT industry and has in parallel worked as a researcher and Associate Professor at NTNU. Since 2005 he has given talks, courses and workshops in visual research dissemination, such as:

  • coaching Researcher Grand Prix participants from NTNU in their preparation for the local and national competition in science communication.
  • teaching new doctoral students at NTNU how to prepare present their research more visually
  • teaching the graduate course Visual Dissemination for technology students at NTNU
  • coaching several researchers from NTNU’s Outstanding Academic Fellows Programme preparing for popular science conferences
  • coaching ERC grant applicants in panel interview preparations

Saara Maria Kauppi, Assistant professor, Department of Design at Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Saara Maria Kauppi is a designer and a PhD student at the Department of Design at Norwegian University of Science and Technology. She is currently finishing her PhD in how packaging design can get people to eat insects. She has been an instructor in several courses on visual research dissemination for teachers, researchers and PhD students.

October 25 2020

15:00-18:00 (3 hours, no break)

Online

Synopsis

Sketching is an ancient practice: from cave painting to picture-books, we have explored the world with our visual senses. Now as technology develops, we are discovering ways in which the traditional visual arts can co-exist alongside the complexity of computing. Within Human-Computer Interaction, this co-existence can be embodied in ideation, design spaces, storytelling and impact, and much more – such as a section of code, rapid prototyping, algorithmic recognition, digital representation and so forth. To learn to sketch gives a researcher or industry practitioner a toolkit of skills, images , and creativity that can support and influence insightful work. We learn to sketch much as we learn to speak, so this is a skill that can be learned at any stage in life. The purpose of this course is to take the learner from basic, hands-on sketching to practical research contexts, with opportunities for practice, feedback, and creative thinking. Attendees will leave with the confidence to begin to employ sketching in their own HCI research and practice.

Audience

The content of this course is suitable for individuals from industry and academia that have an interest in learning and or improving their sketching skills. Novices, experts, and those with an interest are welcome to attend.

Learning outcomes

Sketching is often overlooked in many disciplines, or referred to as a ‘soft’ skill, however, it can support HCI researchers and practitioners to ideate, collaborate, document, and explore and discover complex themes and spaces. This hands-on introductory course intends to celebrate and promote the diverse role of sketching to all practitioners, but also to generate discussion – encouraging participants to adopt sketching in their everyday research and practice. It will cover: warm-up ‘the humble line’, icebreaker ‘participant portraits’, exemplar sketch gallery, visual language, applying sketching in HCI, “without words”, visual narratives: storyboards & comics, design fiction & speculative scenarios, sketching with participants – generation & analysis, accessibility of sketches, and resources, and tools.

Prerequisites

Attendees should have experience with sketching, although limited is acceptable, but prior knowledge regarding its HCI applications is not required.

Instructors

Makayla Lewis, University of the Arts London, United Kingdom. Makayla Lewis (www.makaylalewis.co.uk) is a research fellow at University of the Arts, London, exploring human factors in cybersecurity, smart money, and AI.

Makayla is an accomplished visual thinker and sketcher who organizes sketching events and courses and provides visuals for international companies and conferences such as ACM CHI & ISS.

Miriam Sturdee, Lancaster University, United Kingdom.

Miriam Sturdee is a research fellow at Lancaster University, specialising in creative practice in computing, and investigating how sketching can support the design and development of novel technology. She also has an MFA in Visual Communication from Edinburgh College of Art.